Jersey News

Senatorial Candidates

Senators are voted for island-wide and represent the whole of Jersey.

This year only half of the Senators were up for election because the remaining Senators have only served half their six-year terms.

There were only four spots up for grabs this time because two have been axed in an attempt to streamline the States.

Once the Senators have been voted on, the new Chief Minister will pick his Council of Ministers, choosing a States Member for posts like Treasury Minister and Health.

Outward Chief Minister Terry Le Sueur will be replaced when the newly voted-in States sit in October for the first time. States Members can put themselves forward for the position and then the States vote for their new Chief Minister.

SENATORIAL CANDIDATES

We have asked all the Senatorial candidates to provide us with the answers to some questions – and will be updating each profile as we get this information. All entries below are unedited.

Sir Philip Bailhache – As a former Bailiff and Judge, Sir Philip is no stranger to Jersey politics. As Bailiff, his position was Chief Justice of the island. He studied Law at Oxford University and upon leaving, joined his family’s law firm, Bailhache and Bailhache in St Helier. He lives in Grouville with his second wife Linda and two children, Alice and Edward.

What do you see as the key issue facing Jersey? There are many key issues but, if pressed, I would say that reform of the constitution of the States is most urgent. Without reform, sensible debates and efficient decision-making in relation to the economy, the health service, education, income support and much else are less likely. The number of members of the States should be reduced.

Will you be seeking promotion to the Council of Ministers – if so, which position would you like, and why? I should like to be in a position to influence the work of the proposed Electoral Commission which will lay the foundations for the reform of the constitution of the States. To that end I should like to have an involvement with the Privileges and Procedures Committee. I have no particular ministerial ambitions, but am prepared to serve in any capacity where I might be most useful.

Why should Islanders vote for you? I have had a successful career in the law and have been involved with the work of the States for most of my life. I understand what has gone wrong with the machinery of government, and I think that I can help to put it right. I believe that my experience will enable me to build bridges between members, and to restore faith in the States Assembly.

Senator Freddie Cohen- Current Senator and former Planning Minister. Senator Freddie has hit the headlines recently because he originally announced that he was stepping down from the States, partly due to racist threats made to him and to spend more time with his family. He has now announced that he is standing. He was recently given the position of “Foreign Minister”.

What do you see as the key issue facing Jersey? Jersey is facing testing times in a very uncertain world. Many of our key sectors such as finance, agriculture and tourism have contracted and our ability to maintain our excellent welfare, health and education service will require competence and ingenuity from reliable proven politicians to lead us over the coming years.

Competition from Cayman, Liechtenstein, Luxemburg and Guernsey threatens our prosperity. We will need to be nimble and clever to ensure we do not loose business. If we do not protect our industries such as agriculture, finance and tourism, taxes would have to rise and welfare services fall – tax must not be increased and we must maintain our essential welfare services.

Diversification of our economy is vital as we need more strings to our bow. Properly funded, non means-tested university education and vocational training for young Islanders are essential if we are to match job opportunities with skills and deliver employment for Islanders and continued prosperity to Jersey.

Will you be seeking promotion to the Council of Ministers if so, which position would you like and why? I have served on the Council of Ministers for nearly six years as Environment Minister. This year I was appointed as Assistant Chief Minister with responsibility for UK and International Relations. The job of foreign minister was established as the UK Ministry of Justice cut our support at Westminster and internationally.

My work in this area has already delivered great benefit to the Island from obtaining UK and EU Code Group endorsement of our Zero-Ten regime to delivering school exchange opportunities with China.

I believe our future lies in the international diversification of the economy and I like to continue in my present role.

Why should islanders vote for you?I have a proven track record of making decisions and delivering new policies. I have helped secure vital agreements such as the agreement by the UK Treasury and European Code Group to accept Zero-Ten, so vital to our continued prosperity. I have also delivered new job and business opportunities and introduced a wide range of initiatives ranging from the ECO-ACTIVE programme to the new National Park. I have a proven track record of delivery and wish to continue serving my Island as a full-time politician.

Advocate Rose Colley – One of three female candidates, she is a new candidate and a partner at Viberts law firm, where she works in the family department. She was a Councillor for the London Borough of Southwark from 1984 to 1997 and stood for Parliament at the 1992 General Election. In Jersey she is the former acting Btnnier, chairs the sub-committee of the Law Society. She currently serves on the States of Jersey Appointments Commission, is legal adviser to St John Ambulance in Jersey and sits on the Citizens Advice Bureau Management committee.

What do you see as the key issue facing Jersey?Elected politicians in Jersey need to reconnect with the community. There is a need for constitutional reform of the States of Jersey. There needs to be a full and informed debate of the various options. It is crucial that the public are fully consulted on these reforms including options being put to them in a referendum.

The States needs to immediately reform the way that it debates issues. There is far too much time wasting and many members seem to have forgotten that they are in the States to represent those who elected them and not to simply give a platform to their own personal views.

I believe that there must be a continuing role for the parishes within any reformed States. The parish structure is an excellent way of helping to reconnect with the electorate and consideration should be given to how the role of the parishes could be enhanced.

Will you be seeking promotion to the Council of Ministers if so, which position would you like and why? If it were felt that I was a suitable candidate for the Council of Ministers I would give this very serious consideration. I would, however, only seek Ministerial office in a policy area where I feel that I have sufficient expertise such as education or housing. These are the policy areas that I have always felt passionate about and where I feel that I could add value as a Minister or Assistant Minister.

Why should Islanders vote for you? There are a number of reasons why Islanders should vote for me:

I have many years experience of local government in London including sitting as an elected member on the Inner Education Authority;

Since moving to Jersey in 1997 I have been active in campaigning for a number of social reforms that affect families including the implementation of the Children Law, rights for grandparents and step-parents. I believe that I have been an effective campaigner in these areas and now feel it is the right time to use these skills in the States.

I am passionate about Jersey. However, in recent years, politicians have lost the ability to properly represent those that elected them and unless this tide is turned Jersey will become governed less and less effectively. Such a state of affairs risks the economic and social stability of the Island.

 

Jersey News

My wife used to think I was cute…now she thinks I’m an idiot!

LEE Evans was back at Fort Regent with a bang (and a slightly mad Russian!).

After three long years away from stand-up, he is returning to live comedy with a vengeance this autumn. And he’s clearly relishing the prospect.

Lee Evans”The rush you get from live comedy never wanes,” beams Evans.

“Because it’s a shared experience, the buzz is immediate. Sometimes I’ll go on stage and say stuff that I wrote down in a mad panic in the car on the way to the venue. And when the audience gets it, you think, ‘blimey, you and all!’ “What I love is that it’s a communal thing. We all come together in a room, point out of the window at things and laugh at them. It’s as simple as that.”

Lee is hugely entertaining company. Constantly coming up with one-liners, he possesses what the title of one of his best films describes as Funny Bones. You can’t help but laugh when you’re with him.

Evans has now headlined with dozens of major-league Hollywood stars such as Bruce Willis, Jay Leno, Gary Oldman, Cameron Diaz, Matt Dillon, Christopher Walken, Nathan Lane, Ian McKellen and, um, Jerry Springer.

But success does not appear to have gone to his head. He is still the same lovably shambolic, self-deprecating Southend lad I first met more than 15 years ago.

“Success may be important to other people, but it isn’t to me,” he declares.

“I’ve still got the same mates I’ve had for years, and they treat me in the same way they’ve always done – by taking the mickey!”

Evans is equally self-effacing when it comes to characterising his live show.

“I stand on stage and talk b******s for two hours,” he smiles. “We’re analysing it here, but in fact it’s complete and utter b******s. It won’t solve anything and it won’t change the world, but I hope it relates to people.”

Evans, who scooped the coveted Perrier Award at the Edinburgh Festival as long ago as 1993, is a past-master at working a live audience, with his bravura, sweatsoaked act – he still leaves a towel at the back of the stage so he can periodically wipe the perspiration from his brow. It is a uniquely uplifting act.

One of the principal reasons audiences are drawn to Evans is that he plays the fool so well. A brilliant physical comedian, he is a natural clown, forever tripping over the microphone stand or falling down on stage.

“Obviously, that idiotic persona is exaggerated, but it comes out on stage because of nerves,” says Evans who turned 41 in February.

“I’m not even aware that I’m doing it, but it’s who I am. My dad and my brother and various old friends have for years been desperately trying to get me to be more tough or more sporting or more cool or more fashionable. Unfortunately, it never works!”

During the first half of XL, Lee focuses on the manifold annoyances of Britain.

“The first half will basically be a rant about the things that are really getting on my nerves,” he states. “I’m starting to shout at the telly – and it’s switched off.

“Even though we think we’re in charge of things, in fact we’re losing control of our lives. When you phone up a utility company or the bank, you have to press seven different digits and then listen to Lionel Ritchie for 20 minutes – all for the privilege of talking to a machine at the end of it. You never get through to a human being. Even though I get sucked into this, I find it so irritating.”

In the second half, Evans discusses “what’s been happening in my life”. Inevitably, much of that will centre on relationships. It’s material that will strike a chord with everyone.

“I’ve been married for 21 years now,” he reflects, “and I realise how ridiculous things become when you’ve been married that long. Years ago, if all the change fell out of my trouser-pockets when I was getting undressed, Heather would think it was cute. Now, it’s ‘bloody hell, you idiot!’ And if we try to recapture the romance now by having a bath together, it’s impossible. Women’s bath-water is always far too hot!”

Topics that are preying on Lee’s mind at the moment include his own childhood. “We lived on a rough council estate,” he recalls. “The lift was a toilet.

That’s why it had that sign – ‘maximum load’. We were also forced to eat Brussels sprouts the whole time. We were the only people in the world who had to. They didn’t even eat them in Brussels; people in that city would say, ‘why are they named after us?’ “To an extent, my parents and grandparents wore blinkers about what a person should do, but at least they knew where they were going. I feel it’s all gone a bit mad now, and everything’s very confused. The point is, there is no point.

Maybe I should become a monk. Life would be a lot more simple then: get up, milk a cow, pray a bit and then go back to bed.”

When not touring, Evans has been building up a more than healthy career in the theatre, starring in hugely successful London productions of Endgamewith Michael Gambon, and The Producers, opposite Nathan Lane.

However, he is currently taking a break from Hollywood. “I haven’t read a decent script in months,” he says frankly.

Nor is Evans likely to spend any time making adverts. He is not short of offers to star in commercials, but turns them all down.

“I wouldn’t know what to do if I had to tell people to go and buy something I didn’t use myself,” he shrugs. “I was offered a fortune to do a whisky ad, but I don’t drink whisky.

Jersey News

Jersey Rugby suffer narrow defeat

Jersey Rugby Club narrowly lost their first match in National One away to Fylde by 29 points to 27.

Jersey started well and took an early lead when Ross Broadfoot scored a try.

But Fylde came back strongly with three first half tries, one from Mike Waywell and two from Nick Royle, to lead 24-8 at the break.

Jersey played much better in the second half, scoring tries by Nick Trower, Donny Sanders and Guy Thompson. But another try from Fylde through Steve Briers was enough for them to keep their noses in front.

Jersey had the consolation of two bonus points, for scoring four tries and losing by less than seven, but in reality they’ll rue a first-half performance that lost them a game they could have won.

News

Orang-Cam

Airtel-Vodafone, Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust and Channel Television are delighted to announce a partnership which has enabled the launch of orang-cam. The webcam will be the first in a series of cameras to be placed around the grounds at Durrell to form part of what is envisaged to become a Durrell “web wall”.

The first of the cameras was installed in the orangutan enclosure in May.

Driven by the same technology that drives Airtel-Vodafone’s Puffin-Cam in Burhou, the live feed from orang-cam and eventually the entire “web wall” is hosted exclusively on this website.

The camera will be live on the site between 9 am and 6pm every day and will re-fresh every 60 seconds.

Guernsey News

Royal Court tribute to former assitant magistrate

There’s to be a Royal Court tribute to Guernsey’s former assistant magistrate who has died.

Alan Hancox died on New Year’s Day in hospital in Kenya.

Mr Hancox was Chief Justice of Kenya from 1989 to 1991.

He retired to live in Guerney and became Assistant Magistrate for ten years from 1992. He was sworn as a Lt Bailiff in 1997 and retired five years ago.

A tribute to him will be paid by the Bailiff at the Full Court in the Royal Court on Monday morning. Afterwards Advocate Patrick Palmer will be sworn in as a Lieutenant Bailiff.

News

Watch Channel Television Programmes Online

Missed Channel Report? Catch up with all the news around the Islands right here, each weekday night from 7pm.

You will need a broadband connection and windows media player to view the video.

Monday’s Channel Report

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Tuesday’s Channel Report

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Wednesday’s Channel Report

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Thursday’s Channel Report

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Friday’s Channel Report

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Report Sport

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News

Barclays Pull the Plug

Authorities in Sark say the Barclay Brothers have been bad news for the island.

That’s according to a statement from the island’s Seigneur, Michael Beaumont.

It says: “Of the claimed £5 million investment there is little evidence of it in Sark.

“On the contrary, the authorities believe the island has been financially disadvantaged by the manner of their property transactions, in their tax avoidance schemes and in defence of their legal suits.”

The statement goes on to say: “The Sark authorities consider the reaction to the democratic will of the people unacceptable…

“And whilst we have the greatest sympathy with all those affected, particularly that this should have occurred at this time of year, we remain determined not to be intimidated by such action.”

It’s the first official response from the island’s authorities since the Barclays closed down their businesses in the island.

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The Barclay Brothers have made their first public comment on why they closed down their businesses in Sark last week.

In an article in The Telegraph, which they own, they were described as “being conscious that Christmas is approaching.”

On Monday, their estates manager Kevin Delaney, told Channel Television he was seeking “funding to alleviate hardship.”

An appeal to help people in Sark who were sacked following the election has now reached £2,000.

The Submarine appeal closes on Christmas Eve. The cash will go to Sark’s Procurer des Pauvres who will give it to those most in need.

Neil Inder, Submarine Limited, spoke to channelonline.tv.

Meanwhile the Isle of Sark Shipping Company has made a public assurance that the company is continuing to operate normal scheduled services. A spokesman said only the weather might disrupt sailings.

13/12/08
Sark’s General Purposes and Advisory Committee say they regret the decision to withdraw the Barclay Brothers’ investment programme.

The brothers pulled the plug when their preferred candidates in the general election were mostly rejected by the electorate.

Around 40 young islanders and up to a hundred visiting workers were sacked the day after the election.

The Committee has expressed its sympathy to the families affected by the sudden closures of the hotels, restaurants and shops.

Islanders in Sark are trying to come to terms with devastating news.

Everyone in the island working for Sir David and Sir Frederick Barclay, around 140 people in all, have been made redundant with immediate effect.

Hotels, restaurants and shops have been closed down. The impact of the decision has devastated island families, some of whom have been seen in tears.

The action follows the result of this week’s general election form Sark’s first fully-democratic government.

The sacked workers, a large proportion of the island’s entire workforce, have arranged a meeting for Monday. They want to hear from the newly-elected Chief Pleas about future work prospects.

Meanwhile, the final results of the Result of General Election held on 10th December 2008, to elect 28 Conseillers have been announced.

Jersey News

Under The Greenwood Tree

Top Christmas TV Attraction Filmed Entirely in Jersey

Keeley Hawes and James Murray star in this romantic tale of village life in, a new adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s classic novel UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREE for ITV1. The two-hour drama, screened at the heart of ITV1’s Christmas schedule, is scripted by Ashley Pharaoh, who penned last year’s Christmas hit Tom Brown’s Schooldays, and produced by Ecosse Films, makers of Monarch of the Glen, Like Father Like Son, Amnesia and the award-winning film Mrs Brown.

Set in a rustic English village in the mid 19th century, UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREE tells the story of a poor young man who falls for a beautiful schoolteacher and attempts to win her over. Keeley Hawes (Spooks, Tipping the Velvet) stars as the teacher, Fancy Day, with James Murray (Sons and Lovers, Cutting It) as her suitor Dick Dewy.

Ben Miles plays new parson Maybold, who upsets the villagers with his plans to replace the choir with a new harmonium, with Steve Pemberton as farmer Shiner, Tony Haygarth as Dick’s father Reuben, Tom Georgeson as Fancy’s father Geoffrey, plus Sian Brooke, Jane Wheldon and Terry Mortimer.

Told through four seasons of country life, the drama follows Dick’s attempts to find true love despite his lowly position, while other men with more money vie for Fancy’s affections. Will Fancy follow her heart – or fulfil her sick father’s longing to see her marry well?

The film was shot entirely in Jersey, with locations including Hamptonne Country Life Museum and St Ouen’s Manor.

Producer Jeremy Gwilt says: “UNDER THE GREENWOOD TREE” is a tale of love, changing traditions and the rolling seasons of rural England. Keeley Hawes and James Murray play a couple split by the class divide and I’m sure their story, set against the changes of 19th century country life, will be a perfect festive treat.

“Jersey is one of the most beautiful corners of Britain and has not been used as a major location since the days of Bergerac. We received a warm welcome from the island and are proud to be featuring its heritage sites in our drama.”